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FIGURE 2.2

Paolo Freire’s concept of transformative action (from his book Pedagogy of the Oppressed, 1970) suggests that action, reflection, learning and dialogue together with others (kanohi ki te kanohi) develops a critical consciousness capable of understanding structures of power and recognising social and political contradictions. 

This diagram by Graham Hingangaroa Smith re-imagines this concept as non-linear, where all components occur simultaneously and continuously over time. It has been copied from the original source by the artist’s son Louie (b. 2013), in exchange for $20 worth of Pokémon trading cards from TradeMe. 

 
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SURVIVORS’ ROLL OF HONOUR

Survivors’ Roll of Honour, 2014, screenprint, from one screen on paper, (20 screens used across edition), edition of 20, 76 x 56 cm, Commissioned by the Australian War Memorial Anzac Centenary Print Portfolio in 2014. Curated by Laura Webster.

 

Page 9 of 20: HEWITT H.M. – JARRETT P.T.

From the AWM website:

Based in Auckland, Fiona Jack works across a range of media, undertaking archival research and collaborating with various communities around New Zealand to examine social histories. The prints in this portfolio were commissioned as an edition of 20; however each of Jack’s prints is a unique print. Stretching across a white expanse of 20 sheets is a survivors’ roll of honour.

When thinking about family stories from both the First and Second World Wars Jack realised that “in our large extended family everyone known to me survived”. Growing up she had not recognised the significance of this or appreciated it as a blessing. Tales of traumatised and damaged people returning home carried an emotional weight, and Jack was conscious that while “they hadn’t made the ‘ultimate sacrifice’ their experience was beyond anything I could imagine … yet none of them were on any national roll of honour”.  In contrast to Australia, it was unusual for the names of First World War survivors to be listed on New Zealand memorials, and there was no complete list of those who served and survived.

While it may appear to be a simple list, this singularly exhaustive roll of New Zealanders who fought in and survived the war was painstakingly assembled by Jack in collaboration with historian Phil Lascelles. It remains “the first and most complete list” of New Zealand First World War survivors to date, comprising 108,920 names compiled from original embarkation lists and extensive research.

 

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GENERAL ASSEMBLY

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General Assembly

Fiona Jack, Installation (paint, pencil contributions, documents) Mary Newton Gallery, Wellington, 2008

General Assembly asks why New Zealand voted against ratifying the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007 along with Australia, Canada, and the US. Canada has since signed and Australia have announced that they will, leaving the US and NZ as the only two countries voting against.

The declaration is presented in two parts. The preambular paragraphs, which express the aspirations of the declaration, are each presented as small and detailed paintings of paragraphs that were handwritten by members of the public around the world. The articles of the treaty are written on the wall of the gallery by visitors to the exhibition who choose to contribute.

Update: in April 2010 the NZ government signed this declaration. NZ Herald article

Shinae, Korea, New Zealand
Shinae, Korea, New Zealand
Mose, Samoa, New Zealand
Mose, Samoa, New Zealand
Richard, England, New Zealand
Richard, England, New Zealand
Sock-Cheng, Singapore, New Zealand
Sock-Cheng, Singapore, New Zealand
Sonya, New Zealand, New Zealand
Sonya, New Zealand, New Zealand
Jacinda Australia, Australia
Jacinda Australia, Australia
Rabdeep, New Zealand, New Zealand
Rabdeep, New Zealand, New Zealand
Tamsen, New Zealand, New Zealand
Tamsen, New Zealand, New Zealand
Kassy, New Zealand, New Zealand
Kassy, New Zealand, New Zealand
Peter, Australia, Australia
Peter, Australia, Australia
Sara, New Zealand, Canada
Sara, New Zealand, Canada
Toshi, Canada, Australia
Toshi, Canada, Australia
Ruth, New Zealand, New Zealand
Ruth, New Zealand, New Zealand
Rebecca, New Zealand, New Zealand
Rebecca, New Zealand, New Zealand
Rachel, Australia, New Zealand
Rachel, Australia, New Zealand
Ash, New Zealand, New Zealand
Ash, New Zealand, New Zealand
Jessica, New Zealand, New Zealand
Jessica, New Zealand, New Zealand
Anne-Marie, New Zealand, New Zealand
Anne-Marie, New Zealand, New Zealand
Emily, New Zealand, lives New Zealand
Emily, New Zealand, lives New Zealand
Loretta, Australia, New Zealand
Loretta, Australia, New Zealand
Joyce, New Zealand, New Zealand
Joyce, New Zealand, New Zealand
Andrea, New Zealand, Australia
Andrea, New Zealand, Australia
Andrew, USA, Australia
Andrew, USA, Australia

United Nations forum (Full declaration text avail here)

Converge website – NGO working towards NZ signing the declaration

New Zealand’s statement

Mary Newton Gallery

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UNTITLED (8 Maps)

Centro Cultural Matucana 100, 2006. As part of the Trans Versa exhibition, The South Project.

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A line that goes from the beginning until the end

Text by Camilo Yanez (translated from Spanish)

From that time before fax, internet, mobile phones and notebooks with WIFI, I remember a game that kids used to play, which consisted in the creation of a communication artifact. It was made of simple materials, two plastic glasses and one long piece of cotton thread. The glasses were perforated on the base, the thread passed through and then a knot was made, in order to keep both of the threads joined. The device worked thanks to the tension of the thread, transmitting the waves of sound that one emitted with the glass in its mouth, and that another one listened putting the glass in its ear the hole. Though it was simple and basic, it worked, making the users overcome the distance, establishing some kind of protocol with the clear intention of communicating themselves.

I think about the Transversa Project under the same logic: through a huge invisible thread a stable state, more than a communication protocol, was achieved: a communication state. Almost all of the works reached their final crystallization, with the feedback that produced the in situ situation in Santiago de Chile. Transversa was an open project that played the open way, and that established as the central logic a genuine desire of interchange.

Transversa generated a series of relationships that were connected to each other –some of them programmed, some fortuitous- that in almost four weeks were able to multiply and strengthen. Fiona Jack’s  work, in the huge exterior wall of Centro Cultural Matucana 100  used those principles, conquering in this way it’s own constructive poetic.

From a map of Santiago, Fiona randomly dropped a certain amount of corn  grains, these grains indicated distant and diverse places that she had to investigate and to know, according to her initial working program.

Fiona visited the pointed places, registered and wrote down some notes; she made sketches and pasting, digital photos, photoshop works, underlined some texts, developed technical data and infinity of steps that were edited every day to form part of the artwork. The fugacity of every new fact and its latency in the immediate memory constituted a main part of her artwork on the wall.

Neither abstract nor figurative, the artwork was a formal cartography full of intimate anecdotes that rapidly acquired features of universality. The mural work of Jack overflowed its own way of operating proposing a new visual in the area, different from grafittis, political publicity or poster pasting.

At first sight the enormous wall did not impose its presence in the street, on the contrary, it discovered itself step by step. With the color, figuration and textuality the artwork showed its intention of being a new trace, formally and conceptually speaking. A bidimensional painting, that represented a multidirectional circulation and communication system, whose depth of perspective was given by the experience of the artist, in the place where the artwork was made.

More than once, during the elaboration of the mural, different persons wrote or draw over the work, and Fiona,instead of covering and hiding, marked and pointed those interventions, as a way of accenting the interaction of others on her work.

There’s no doubt that Fiona Jack’s artwork managed to specify an invisible line from the origin place to the destiny place, in the same way that the sphere of Pascal raised by Borges, the work managed to have its center everywhere and its perimeter anywhere.

Camilo Yañez. Artist and Curator.  Cobquecura, January 2007.

Photo: Joaquin Luzoro, 2006
Photo: Joaquin Luzoro, 2006
Photo: Joaquin Luzoro, 2006
Photo: Joaquin Luzoro, 2006
Photo: Joaquin Luzoro, 2006
Photo: Joaquin Luzoro, 2006
Photo: Joaquin Luzoro, 2006
Photo: Joaquin Luzoro, 2006

 

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UNDO WHAT IS RIVETED. SEE RIVER.

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Undo what is riveted. see river

Physics Room, Christchurch, 2006

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I CAN CROSS THESE LINES, I CAN WALK THESE ROADS, I CAN CHANGE THESE COLOURS

i-can-walk--1x900

I can cross these lines, I can walk these roads, I can change these colours

Gallery A402, CalArts, Los Angeles, USA, 2005

 

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MISSING PEOPLES

Self published, laser print, perfect bound, edition of 188, 2004.

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From the introduction to the book:

Screen Shot 2014-01-13 at 1.50.23 PM

PDF of book can be viewed here

Inlcuded with each edition of the book is a copy of the letter sent to the editor of Merriam-Westers’ Collegiate Dictionary, along with a copy of their response. These letters can be viewed here:

Letter to editor

Merriam Webster letter

 

 

 

 

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MISSING PEOPLES’ THINGS

 Silkscreen on wallpaper, 2004

final wallpaper

The objects listed/pictured are present as text entries in Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (Eleventh Edition) and are all objects originating from the country of their name. However in these 21 instances while objects from country are listed, the people of that country are not listed in the dictionary.

 

Full title: Missing Peoples’ Things: Austrian Pine, Bermuda bag, Bermuda grass, Bermuda Onion, Bermuda rig, Bermudas, Brazil nut, brazil wood, cayman, Cuba libre, Cuban heel, Cuban sandwich, Iceland moss, Iceland poppy, Iceland spar, Jamaica rum, morocco, Norfolk Island pine, panama, panama red,  Sudan grass.

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PROPOSAL FOR EL TORO LANDSCAPE PAINTINGS

Contribution to The Great Park Project  for the Orange County Bienniale, with FutureFarmers/Amy Francescini, 2004

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Project description from the website: The Great Park Project as presented by FutureFarmers is a critical enquiry into the future land use of this former military base. The project was conceived for the 2004 California Biennial at the Orange County Museum of Art and Orange Lounge. The Great Park Project on Orange County’s former El Toro Marine Corps was being developed into “America’s biggest public park”. This transitional space offers fertile ground for research and discourse surrounding notions of the political and social organization of open space in urban areas.

The paintings were developed using a colour key which overlapped proposed uses for the controversial development (housing, parks, industrial, research, and so on) with colour schemes drawn from prolific Californian home builders Warmington Homes.

warmington #3 traditional

 

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WALL PAINTING

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Wall Painting

Blue Oyster Gallery, Dunedin, 2000

 

blueoy2

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NOTHING

33 billboards, Auckland City, 1997

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About

Fiona Jack has an MFA from CalArts (2005) and lives and works in Auckland, New Zealand.